Þræði

Þræði, to thread, was our group exhibition.  It was fun to see everyone's work on gallery walls, and it was nice to see the array of artwork displayed together.  A future collaboration even came out of this exhibit, so I'm really excited to continue developing that as well.

Icelandic Fog, Kim Mirus, 2015 I used Icelandic wool to carefully card and handspin this gradient into the yarn.  It was then woven with carefully sourced wool from a small farm of happy sheep, and hung from a piece of driftwood that arrived as I finished the piece.  This piece serves as an extensive study that will inform my next pieces woven from my handspun yarn.

Icelandic Fog, Kim Mirus, 2015

I used Icelandic wool to carefully card and handspin this gradient into the yarn.  It was then woven with carefully sourced wool from a small farm of happy sheep, and hung from a piece of driftwood that arrived as I finished the piece.  This piece serves as an extensive study that will inform my next pieces woven from my handspun yarn.

Icelandic Tog Study In this study I experimented with ways to weave and emphasize the Icelandic tog, or the long, outer locks, of the wool.  I am incorporating raw materials with processed ones in my weavings not only to create dimensional texture, but also to draw attention to the materials themselves.  

Icelandic Tog Study

In this study I experimented with ways to weave and emphasize the Icelandic tog, or the long, outer locks, of the wool.  I am incorporating raw materials with processed ones in my weavings not only to create dimensional texture, but also to draw attention to the materials themselves.  

Detail from the Icelandic Tog Study

Detail from the Icelandic Tog Study